A retired teacher teaches the citizens of the world about the dog in the street!

Retired teacher Bülent Akın Dönertaş gives English lessons to citizens of the world for the care of street animals.

In Aydın Karasu, retired teacher Bülent Akın Dönertaş teaches classes on feeding and caring for neighborhood dogs. Dönertaş, who gives online English lessons to foreign citizens of various ages and professions at an affiliated language school in Japan, spends the money he earns on street dogs.

Retired teacher Bülent Akın Dönertaş, who has long devoted his life to stray animals, has been volunteering the work of feeding stray dogs and cleaning their habitats at a shelter for 11 months. Stating that it is a crime to throw dogs into areas where they cannot find food, Dönertaş made the following statements to ANKA news agency:

‘I MEET THEIR NEEDS BY TEACHING

“When my pension wasn’t enough to pay for the house I bought, I started working at an online language school in Japan 4 years ago. I teach English from home in students from countries like Japan, Austria and Canada. I have been meeting the needs of stray animals by giving extra evening English lessons for some time. I am not a dog person, I am crazy dogs, but I can’t stay silent no matter who the victim is. Even if a snake is killed for fun, I can’t stay quiet. I don’t want to see victims, animals or humans The condition of the dogs was very bad. This is a train station. It is not considered a shelter by any standards. The number of cages is very low, but I have taken dogs there that needed care. We have 2 paralyzed dogs, we have 5 abandoned stray puppies, there are two puppies whose mothers are in a coma. It is very difficult for them to survive under normal conditions. I also have puppies at home. They couldn’t even drink breast milk. They are very small, we try to keep these dogs alive. The dogs are in very poor condition. Their population is not controlled. The authorities do not have a serious study such as sterilization and canine population control. The units concerned by this problem are not aware of the sterilization studies. It is also expensive for citizens, as the cost of neutering a dog is 850 lira.

‘IF EVERYONE SHARE A BREAK

I receive 4-5 packets of dry food per month from the district governor’s office. I support most of my needs out of my own pocket. The Green Artvin bakery helps out 50-60 stale loaves a week. We bring here the remains of one of our schools with the help of the cafeteria service and the municipality. That’s how I get their food. I meet all their needs myself, 2 hours a day. I prepare their meals, give them water, clean their dirt, take care of our sick dogs, take care of our dogs who are neutered and take care of them on a daily basis. I’ve been doing this for about 11 months. In no case did they come to an outside person and tell him that I would help him for his good. I am currently looking for people to work here for a fee. There is not a lot of demand. Candidates give reasons like I’m disgusted by distance and dog poo. I was disgusted too. But someone has to.

‘STUDENTS MUST VISIT HERE

Addressing teachers and the National Education Directorate, Dönertaş continued his speech as follows:

“Please get our children here before the schools close. We can sensitize our children. We cannot see dogs as creatures that need to be saved. The dog population in Turkey is 12 million and the population is 85 million. There are no hungry dogs around. The French population is 63 million. The number of dogs is 60 million, but you can’t see the dogs around. It’s a “I’ll fix this” problem. I counted 167 dogs in Karacasu. It was maybe 200 now. I wrote to the Presidency, they promised me help. They talked about the law. It has been said that there is a jail term of 3 months to 2 years for dogs that are thrown from where they are to where they cannot live. Please feed your dogs and sterilize them, but do not remove or throw them away. These dogs die swearing. If every household gives a bite for 167 dogs in Karacasu, I will feed the dogs in all the villages of Karacasu. It’s about saying, “I’m going to solve this problem.” »

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