When you learn this interesting information about Iceland, you will want to move and settle there.

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1. Iceland is the only place in the world where you can swim between two tectonic plates.

1. Iceland is the only place in the world where you can swim between two tectonic plates.

The Silfra fissure in Iceland is the only place where you can physically touch two continents at the same time. So at this point you can touch the North American and Eurasian continents at the same time. As tectonic plates pull apart, fissures form between continents. The Silfra fissure in Iceland is one such fissure. Not only that, it is one of the cleanest waters in the world. The Silfra Fissure was designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2004.

2. In Akureyri, Iceland, the traffic lights have red hearts instead of red circles.

2. In Akureyri, Iceland, the traffic lights have red hearts instead of red circles.

During the economic crisis of 2008, Icelanders entered a great depression. To boost the morale of locals, the municipality designed traffic light lights in the shape of hearts in Akureyri, Iceland’s second largest city. This way they try to keep people positive in traffic.

3. Iceland’s only native mammal is the arctic fox.

3. Iceland's only native mammal is the arctic fox.

There are 8-10,000 arctic foxes living in Iceland. These magnificent animals are on the Red List of the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The species is endangered.

4. As a traditional Christmas present in Iceland, people give each other books as gifts.

4. As a traditional Christmas present in Iceland, people give each other books as gifts.

Iceland is one of the most literate countries in the world. In the tradition called “Jolabokaflod” or “Christmas Book Flood,” on December 24, people give each other books as gifts and spend the night reading. This tradition II. It started with the limitation of souvenir making due to World War II financial constraints. Thus, books have become the protagonist of Christmas.

5. Icelanders have developed an app that shows whether they are related to their partner or not.

5. Icelanders have developed an app that shows whether they are related to their partner or not.

Iceland has a population of 360,000 and is an island nation with very little immigration. The likelihood of being related to someone in such a small country is also quite high. The Íslendinga app lists the kinship relationships of all Icelanders since the 11th century. This database shows who is linked to whom.

6. In Iceland, all members of the same family can have a different surname.

6. In Iceland, all members of the same family can have a different surname.

When two people get married in Iceland, they use their own surname. If the couple has a son, a new surname is formed by adding “-suffix” to the end of the father’s or mother’s surname, and adding “-dóttir” if they have daughters. Thus, everyone’s surname may be different.

7. Some Icelanders believe that elves exist and that there is an elven school in Reykjavik.

7. Some Icelanders believe that elves exist and that there is an elven school in Reykjavik.

54% of Icelanders think elves are real. And the elves have tiny elf houses to remind them of their presence on earth.

8. Iceland has a huge rock shaped like an elephant’s head.

8. Iceland has a huge rock shaped like an elephant's head.

Elephant Rock is a basalt rock found on Westman Island in Iceland. The Westman Islands were formed by a series of volcanic eruptions and interestingly shaped rocks such as Elephant Rock were formed.

9. The world’s first democratically elected female president was Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, elected in 1980 in Iceland.

9. The world's first democratically elected female president was Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, elected in 1980 in Iceland.

Vigdís Finnbogadóttir is Iceland’s fourth president and the world’s first democratically elected female president. She is also Iceland’s only female president to date.

10. There is a word in Icelandic that means ‘Ice Cream Journey’.

10. There is a word in Icelandic that means 'Ice Cream Journey'.

Icelanders can eat ice cream regardless of the weather. They love ice cream so much they even have a word for it. ‘ísbíltúr’ is a compound word meaning ice cream trip.

11. There are no McDonald’s in Iceland.

11. There are no McDonald's in Iceland.

Iceland’s first McDonald’s opened in 1993, but it didn’t last long and the last McDonald’s closed in 2009.

12. There are no mosquitoes in Iceland.

12. There are no mosquitoes in Iceland.

The cold weather in Iceland is not a favorable environment for mosquitoes to live. Although there are around 1,300 species of insects in Iceland, there are no mosquitoes.

13. Icelandic parents often put their babies outside in the cold.

13. Icelandic parents often put their babies outside in the cold.

In Iceland, it is believed that putting babies to sleep in the cold strengthens the immune system, after having dressed them well, of course. Perhaps there is some truth to this, as the average life expectancy in Iceland is 82 years.

14. Parents in Iceland must choose a name for their baby from an approved list or seek approval from the names committee.

14. Parents in Iceland must choose a name for their baby from an approved list or seek approval from the names committee.

In Iceland, you cannot name your baby whatever name you want. The Icelandic Names Committee lists approved names and parents must choose a name from this list. If they wish to choose an unlisted name, they must seek committee approval.

15. You can cover all of Iceland in less than 24 hours.

15. You can cover all of Iceland in less than 24 hours.

24 hours is not enough time to explore this beautiful country, but you can drive around the whole country in 24 hours from the ring road by car.

16. Iceland has about 130 volcanoes, of which about 30 are active.

16. Iceland has about 130 volcanoes, of which about 30 are active.

The last volcanic eruption took place on March 19.

17. The colors of the Icelandic flag symbolize the three elements of the country’s landscape.

17. The colors of the Icelandic flag symbolize the three elements of the country's landscape.

The colors of the flag represent the country’s three natural landscapes. Red; volcanic fire, white; ice and blue; Seen from the shore, it represents the blue of the mountains of the island.

18. Iceland’s most famous dish is the hot dog.

18. Iceland's most famous dish is the hot dog.

Hot dogs can be considered the national dish of Iceland. You can find hot dogs everywhere you go in Iceland.

19. Children receive Christmas presents from 13 Yule Gentlemen.

19. Children receive Christmas presents from 13 Yule Gentlemen.

You could say that the Yule Children are the Icelandic Santa Clauses. They are 13 and it is believed that they bring presents to the children at Christmas. Children are told Yule stories on cold winter nights

20. From 1924 to 1984, dogs were banned as pets in Reykjavik.

20. From 1924 to 1984, dogs were banned as pets in Reykjavik.

In the nation’s capital, Reykjavik, people were banned from having dogs as pets between 1924 and 1984. It wasn’t because they hated dogs. Dogs have been found to carry echinococcosis, a type of tapeworm. This is why people are prohibited from keeping dogs as pets within the city limits. Such a ban no longer exists, but residents of Reykjavik still need a license to own a dog, and owners must be microchipped and vaccinated.

21. Reykjavik is the northernmost capital in the world.

21. Reykjavik is the northernmost capital in the world.

22. The mayor of Reykjavik from 2010 to 2014 was a comedian with no political training.

22. The mayor of Reykjavik from 2010 to 2014 was a comedian with no political training.

Jón Gnarr is a well-known actor and comedian in Iceland. Gnarr, who has nothing to do with politics, founded his own party and served as mayor of Reykjavik Municipality between 2010 and 2014.

23. The Icelandic Parliament is the oldest parliament in the world.

23. The Icelandic Parliament is the oldest parliament in the world.

The Icelandic National Parliament is called “Althingi”. It is the oldest parliament in the world that has survived to this day. It was first established in 930 in what is now known as Thingvellir National Park. Parliament still exists.

24. March 1 is Icelandic Beer Day.

24. March 1 is Icelandic Beer Day.

Beer is a popular drink among Icelanders. So it may surprise you that beer has been illegal for quite some time. People started celebrating it every year, 74 years later, on March 1, when the ban on beer was finally lifted, as Icelandic Beer Day, or Bjordagur.

25. Iceland does not have a railway system.

25. Iceland does not have a railway system.

Although there is a railway for transporting construction materials, there is no railway for public use. The reason for this is believed to be the low population.

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